How do you view “disability”?

1 in 5 people in the United States have a disability. [5] This number is anything but insignificant. We live in a world surrounded by “disabled” people. I put this word in quotes because of the constant change that comes along with this words definition. Depending on the environment you live in and the culture you […]

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Inventor and Oppressor: Alexander Graham Bell, Eugenics, and the Deaf Community

  Alexander Graham Bell is best known for inventing the telephone, a device that has connected mankind on a global scale since its conception. Strangely enough, this same man spent a portion of his life working to keep people apart. Bell was a firm believer in eugenics, which has been defined as the science of better […]

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Emotional Trauma in the Jim Crow South: Truth in Fiction Through Richard Wright’s ‘Uncle Tom’s Children’

The most difficult part of tragedy is, arguably, the aftermath. Coping takes different forms, music, artwork, writing, dialogues, and many others. Each is equally valid, yet nuances in these expressions can create confusion as to what life post-tragedy truly entails. Historian Kidada E. Williams calls for scholars to further investigate analyze the expressions of experiences […]

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Oppression and Agency: Opposing Themes in Uncle Tom’s Children

In his collection of short stories, Uncle Tom’s Children, Richard Wright demonstrates the challenges of being black in the Jim Crow South. His characters deal with everything from insults and condescension to violence and death, and yet because of their strength and their responses to these challenges, the characters do not come across as victims. […]

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